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Virtual environments are a convenient way for you to have complete control over potentially many versions of Python. The physnodes provides the conda utility, as part of the Miniconda module, to allow you to create and manage virtual Python environments. This page describes the basics of using conda, as well as some physnode-specific configuration that you are likely to find useful. The full documentation of conda can be found in the conda online documentation.

Initial Setup

Before you get started using conda on the physnodes, there is a small amount of configuration that you can set up to make working with multiple Python environments much more straightforward. By default, conda will create environments and install packages into subdirectories of your HOME directory, namely:

/home/userfs/e/USERNAME/.conda/envs
/home/userfs/e/.conda/pkgs

These directories inevitably end up containing many files, and will take up a lot of disk space. In order for you to avoid running out of space, you can tell conda to create environments and install packages into a subdirectory of your scratch space instead of your HOME directory. To do this, you need to complete a few simple tasks:

  1. Create directories in your scratch space to contain your Python environments and packages. An example of this is: /scratch/username/python_environments/envs and /scratch/username/python_environments/pkgs

    cd ~
    mkdir -p /scratch/username/python_environments/envs
    mkdir -p /scratch/username/python_environments/pkgs
  2. Create a conda configuration file in your HOME directory, specifically: 
    /home/userfs/e/USERNAME/.condarc
  3. Add content to the newly-created .condarc configuration file to tell conda where to create environments and install packages. Using the example directory names from step 1, this would look like:
envs_dirs:
  - /scratch/username/python_environments/envs
pkgs_dirs:
  - /scratch/username/scratch/python_environments/pkgs

You will also need to load the Miniconda module, which will enable you to make use of the conda tools. You can do this by running:

module load lang/Miniconda3

in the shell. At this point, you are ready to use the conda utility with no risk of hitting the 100,000 files quota on your HOME directory, as there is no number of files quota on your scratch space!

Creating an Environment

There are a few different ways in which environments can be created using the conda utility, but we are going to describe what is perhaps the most reliable and reproducible way in which it can be done - using an environment file. An environment file is a YAML file that describes the Python environment that you would like to create. Once this file has been created, the environment it represents can be created using the conda utility. This allows you to recreate the same environment in multiple places, and easily pass on a specification for a Python environment to other users. A simple example of an environment file is shown below.

name: my_first_environment
channels:
  - conda-forge
dependencies:
  - python=3.7
  - numpy
  - ipython
  - pip:
    - mido

The above file, my_first_environment.yaml, describes the following things about a Python environment:

  • name: the name of the Python environment. This is the name that will be used to refer to the environment when using the conda tools
  • channels: the Anaconda Cloud channels that should be used to find packages for this environment. There are many channels available, but the two most common that you will see are defaults, which contains stable packages curated by the Anaconda team, and conda-forge, a community-led channel containing a wide range of high-quality packages that are often of a more recent version than those in defaults
  • dependencies: the dependencies of the Python environment that you want to create. In the example above, we have specified a Python version that we want to use (3.7), some packages to be installed from the conda-forge channel that we named earlier in the environment file, and a package to be installed from PyPI through pip, as the package is not available from the conda-forge channel

You can read more about environment files in the conda user guide.

Create a yaml file somewhere on disk.  You can start with creating the above example as a test (my_first_environment.yaml) if you wish. 

Now that you have an environment file, my_first_environment.yaml, somewhere on disk, you can create the environment that we have specified using conda:

conda env create -f my_first_environment.yaml

Here you are telling conda to create a new environment using the file (-fmy_first_environment.yaml as the specification. Once the environment has been installed, you should be able to confirm that the environment exists by using the info subcommand of the conda tool:

[klcm500@login1(viking) Python]$ conda info --envs
# conda environments:
#
base                  *  /opt/apps/easybuild/software/lang/Miniconda3/4.4.10
my_first_environment     /users/klcm500/scratch/python_environments/envs/my_first_environment

At this point, the Python environment my_first_environment has been created, and is ready to be used. Note: the asterisk in the output of conda info --envs indicates which conda environment is currently activated. As you haven't yet activated your new environment, the base environment (over which you have no control) is activated.

Using an Environment

Once an environment has been created, you can activate it using the source activate command. This can be seen clearly in the following example:

[klcm500@login2(viking) ~]$ command -v python
/opt/apps/easybuild/software/lang/Miniconda3/4.4.10/bin/python

[klcm500@login2(viking) ~]$ source activate my_first_environment

(my_first_environment) [klcm500@login2(viking) ~]$ command -v python
/users/klcm500/scratch/Python/envs/my_first_environment/bin/python

The execution of command -v python is not necessary, just used to illustrate that the Python environment has changed from base to my_first_environment.

You have now activated the my_first_environment environment, which changes the Python executable in my PATH from the default Miniconda Python to the Python from my_first_environment. All of the necessary environment changes have been made such that you can use Python as normal, but with a guarantee of no conflict with other Python installations on the system. Your shell prompt will include the name of the current Python environment in parentheses to remind you that you are in a specific Python environment.

If you wish to add more packages into my_first_environment, you can use conda or pip to install them into the environment. You must activate my_first_environment first, though! Taking pytest as an example, you first see that it is not available in your environment:

(my_first_environment) [klcm500@login2(viking) ~]$ python

Python 3.7.1 | packaged by conda-forge | (default, Mar 13 2019, 12:57:14)
[GCC 7.3.0] :: Anaconda, Inc. on linux
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.

>>> import pytest
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ModuleNotFoundError: No module named 'pytest'
>>>

You can then install it using conda:

(my_first_environment) [klcm500@login2(viking) ~]$ conda install pytest
Solving environment: done

## Package Plan ##

  environment location: /users/klcm500/scratch/Python/envs/my_first_environment

  added / updated specs:
    - pytest


The following packages will be downloaded:

    package                    |            build
    ---------------------------|-----------------
    certifi-2019.3.9           |           py37_0         155 KB
    pluggy-0.9.0               |           py37_0          30 KB
    attrs-19.1.0               |             py_0          35 KB
    more-itertools-6.0.0       |           py37_0          89 KB
    pytest-4.3.0               |           py37_0         349 KB
    py-1.8.0                   |           py37_0         140 KB
    atomicwrites-1.3.0         |             py_0           9 KB
    ------------------------------------------------------------
                                           Total:         808 KB

The following NEW packages will be INSTALLED:

    atomicwrites:    1.3.0-py_0
    attrs:           19.1.0-py_0
    more-itertools:  6.0.0-py37_0
    pluggy:          0.9.0-py37_0
    py:              1.8.0-py37_0
    pytest:          4.3.0-py37_0

The following packages will be UPDATED:

    certifi:         2019.3.9-py37_0     conda-forge --> 2019.3.9-py37_0
    openssl:         1.1.1b-h14c3975_1   conda-forge --> 1.1.1b-h7b6447c_1

The following packages will be DOWNGRADED:

    ca-certificates: 2019.3.9-hecc5488_0 conda-forge --> 2019.1.23-0

Proceed ([y]/n)? y

Downloading and Extracting Packages
certifi 2019.3.9: ################################################################## | 100%
pluggy 0.9.0: ###################################################################### | 100%
attrs 19.1.0: ###################################################################### | 100%
more-itertools 6.0.0: ############################################################## | 100%
pytest 4.3.0: ###################################################################### | 100%
py 1.8.0: ########################################################################## | 100%
atomicwrites 1.3.0: ################################################################ | 100%
Preparing transaction: done
Verifying transaction: done
Executing transaction: done

Here conda has to download and install some dependencies for the new package pytest, as well as solve some dependency issues that result in a couple of already installed packages needing to be downgraded. Once this process is complete, you can immediately use the new pytest package in your environment:

(my_first_environment) [klcm500@login2(viking) ~]$ python

Python 3.7.1 | packaged by conda-forge | (default, Mar 13 2019, 12:57:14)
[GCC 7.3.0] :: Anaconda, Inc. on linux
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.

>>> import pytest
>>>

If the package that you wanted to install was not available through conda install, you could just have easily installed it using pip install instead.

Once you are finished using your Python environment, it can be easily exited using the source deactivate command:

(my_first_environment) [klcm500@login2(viking) ~]$ source deactivate
[klcm500@login2(viking) ~]$

You will notice that the first section of the bash prompt - (my_first_environment) - disappears after the source deactivate command successfully runs. This lets you know that you have left my_first_environment. Sure enough, the Python executable that is in the PATH is no longer the one from my_first_environment:

[klcm500@login2(viking) ~]$ command -v python
/opt/apps/easybuild/software/lang/Miniconda3/4.4.10/bin/python

At this point, we can specify and create Python virtual environments with conda, we can switch between them, use them, and update them with any necessary new packages.

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