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This page documents training resources, groups and other support for open research practice across the University.

We have also created a Slack channel #york-open-research (link opens in Slack) where colleagues from across the University can share expertise and ask questions about their research.

Name/deptDescriptionLinksContact
Open Science Interest Group (Psychology)

Our group promotes the use of open science practices in the Department of Psychology and the wider University community through education, advice and peer support. 

We meet regularly to discuss and share best practice in open science. We provide support for those outside of the group who wish to engage in open science through educational resources, workshops and one-to-one peer support.

We also make proposals to the department to incentivise the use of open science practices.

https://www.york.ac.uk/psychology/research/groups/open-science/Angela de Bruin
ReproducibiliTea (Psychology)A forum to informally discuss issues of open science and consider the reproducibility of our research practices. ReproducibiliTea (https://reproducibilitea.org/) is an initiative supported by the UK Reproducibility Network, and there are now more than 50 journal clubs across the world.

We meet fortnightly on Thursdays at 12pm, and welcome researchers from across disciplines to join the discussion. 

https://osf.io/wz463/

Education Researchers for Open Science (EROS)

EROS is an Open Science working group within the Department of Education who believe that the evidence based benefits of open science practices can apply to all paradigms/approaches, though at different levels and in different ways.

https://www.york.ac.uk/education/research/eros/

Dr. Cylcia Bolibaugh ran an Open Data training session to discuss embargoes and access restrictions and what Research Data York can handle at the moment: https://cbolibaugh.github.io/OpenDataWorkshop/


Research Coding Club

An informal group for people who work with research software. We get together every other week, and run two main types of meetup.

Drop-in Code Clinic: a group call on which you can discuss problems / ideas / anything around the topic of research software. Somebody will do their best to point you in the right direction on a problem, and all will be happy just to chat!

Seminars: we invite people from around the university to deliver a short talk (up to an hour) on a topic of interest. These can be pitched at any level, and usually end with a lively discussion.

https://researchcodingclub.github.io/



Research Computing Support wikiA place for finding information on the facilities available, training courses, events and other sources of support for research or high performance computing.https://wiki.york.ac.uk/display/RCS/Research+Computing+SupportIT Support Office
University Library Open Research Team

The Open Research team (formerly Research Support) works in partnership with academic and research staff, postgraduate research students, and other staff facilitating research.

We provide guidance and training to help you plan, publish, preserve and share your research. We can help with:

  • Open Access, including University policy, funder mandates, and REF OA requirements
  • research data management, including University and funder data policies, data management planning, and advocacy for good practice
  • Open Research, promoting openness and transparency in research, and developing networks of practice
  • copyright legislation, exceptions and related licences concerning scholarly publications
  • ORCID iDs and other identifiers
  • citation analysis and bibliometrics, general principles and practice for individual researchers.

Open Research Team home page

Open Research Practical Guide - offers an introduction to open research methods which can be applied at different stages of your work. 

RDM 101 tutorial (on the VLE)

Research Data York

lib-open-research@york.ac.uk

Coding: a Practical Guide (Library & IT Services)

Computer coding is mentioned a lot these days as a key digital skill and it is a great way to make computers do what you need them to do and create new and exciting things on them. In this guide, we look at what coding is, how you get started doing in, and how to learn to code in a variety of coding languages, with resources, exercises, and suggestions for taking your knowledge further.

https://subjectguides.york.ac.uk/coding/home

We also deliver an Introduction to Programming and an Introduction to programming with Python course which is limited to staff and PGR students.






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